physics

High Energy Astrophysics and the Origin of Cosmic Rays

Registration: 
Registration is required.
Date: 
21 May, 2010
Time: 
10 am
Venue: 
Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore
Abstract: 

The origin of Galactic cosmic-ray ions has remained an enigma for almost a century. Although it has generally been thought that they are accelerated in the shock waves associated with powerful supernova explosions—for which there have been recent claims of evidence—the mystery is far from resolved. Cosmic rays, which are mostly protons, but also other ions and electrons, permeate our Galaxy and rain down on earth continuously, night and day. Although cosmic rays were discovered almost a century ago, back in the balloon age, their origins remain unclear even now. Almost no effort has been spared in pursuing this long-standing mystery: satellites, rockets and balloons have been launched, and enormous detector arrays have been installed on the ground and even under mountains and seas. I will give a historical overview of the search for the mysterious origin of cosmic rays and a report on the current status.

Resource People: 
Speaker
Dr. Yousaf Butt
Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics, United States

Laser Turns 50

First National Symposium on Lasers
Sponsors & Collaborators: 

Jointly organized by the Centre for Solid State Physics, Punjab University, Lahore.

Registration Procedure:

To register for, this symposium: please visit this link. Registration is free, but please do register, to ave yourself from any inconvenience. These individuals have already registered for the event through the web interface,

Registration: 
Registration is required.
Date: 
13 May, 2010
Time: 
9 am
Venue: 
Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore
Abstract: 

Lasers from Islamabad, Lahore and Cern: What Binds them Together (Dr. Shaukat Hameed Khan)

The laser is just 50 years old but it is shaping our lives in diverse manners. One key area is precision of measurement. A small Pakistani innovation to the design of the system which makes up the massive detectors in the Large Hadron Collidor at CERN in Geneva is discussed. This is placed in the context of mankind’s greater quest over the centuries for precision, whether these relate to his position on earth or in space, or timekeeping.  The principal features of the laser programme in Pakistan is presented briefly.

Laser-generated Pulsed X-ray Sources (Dr. Fida Khattak)

I would be presenting the basic principles of x-ray generation via different schemes using high power laser pulses for the non-specialized. I would be also presenting some experimental results for the audience having research interest in the field.

Fundamentals of Fiber-optic Communications (Dr. Mumtaz Sheikh)

Ever since the advent of the internet, fiber optic communication systems play an important role in our everyday lives. This talk would  focus on how do these systems work, what is so special about them compared to traditional electrical communication systems, what kind of
lasers are suitable for such systems, what are some of the issues and tradeoffs that a designer has to consider while designing such systems and where is the technology headed in the future.

Light: Its Applications in Interferometery, Polarimetry and Photodynamic Therapy (Dr. Masroor Ikram)

Light is one of the oldest subject but its true nature has yet to be fully discovered. For more than hundred years its dual nature is well accepted. Optics and Laser Group in PIEAS has worked on some of its applications. Michelson interferometer was reported in the late nineteenth century but its use for precise measurement of angle and axis of rotation is reported very recently. Polarization imaging can produce very high contrast and the technique is useful for material characterization. Photodynamic therapy is an emerging technique to cure the cancers with high selectivity. In the technique, two individually non-toxic components brought together to cause harmful effects on cells and tissues in the presence of oxygen.

Resource People: 
Keynote Speaker
Dr. Shaukat Hameed Khan
Executive Director SORPEST
Speaker
Dr. Fida Khattak
Professor, Kohat University
Speaker
Dr. Masroor Ikram
Proessor and Chairman of Physics, PIEAS, Islamabad
Speaker
Dr. Mumtaz Sheikh
Assistant Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering, LUMS, School of Science and Engineering

Stellar Pots

Nature's Recycling Factory
Registration: 
Open to all.
Date: 
27 February 2009, Friday
Time: 
11 am
Venue: 
Department of Physics, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore
Abstract: 

The iron running in our blood, calcium in our teeth, the sand we walk on, were all made inside stars. All elements heavier than boron are formed by nuclear reactions inside stars. We owe our existence to these stellar pots. Stars live for millions to billions of years and then it is a fierce battle for their survival. Ultimately they loose the battle and the resulting supernovae disperse the synthesized elements in the universe. Nature does not know of waste products and from stellar dust many more stars are created. In this talk we would discuss the birth and demise of stars. It is for the audience to decide if it is more of stellar science or abstract art.

Resource People: 
Lecturer
Dr. Jameel-un-Nabi
Ghulam Ishaque Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, NWFP

Usefulness of Extra Dimensions of Spacetime

Registration: 
Open to all.
Date: 
27 January 2009, Tuesday
Time: 
6 pm
Venue: 
Environmental Law College, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore
Resource People: 
Speaker
Dr. Pervez Hoodbhoy
Chairman, Department of Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad

Nanowires Grown by Beam Epitaxy

Registration: 
Open to all.
Date: 
04 December 2008
Time: 
11 am
Venue: 
Centre for Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore
Abstract: 

Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are attracting wide interest due to their unique physical properties and potential for application in nanodevices. NWs can be obtained by a number of growth methods, and their highly anisotropic growth originates by the presence of a metal particle, the catalyst, that determines the position and the diameter of the nanostructure. The most widely used catalyst is gold. The growth mechanism of catalyst assisted nanowires involves the incorporation of material both impinging on the catalyst particle and diffusing from the free substrate surface to the sidewalls of the wire. The interplay of these two phenomena is critical especially for the growth of alloy semiconductor compound NWs and one dimensional (1-D) heterostructure. Difference in the surface mobility between the constituents could give compositional inhomogeneities in alloy NWs and degradation of the interface sharpness in 1-D heterostructure. The systematic presence of a metal particle at the NWs tip could be exploited in single NW devices. Moreover, one of the most interesting characteristic of the III-V NWs grown by catalyst assisted self assembling is the peculiarity of having an hexagonal lattice structure (wurtzite), while their bulk and epitaxial parent materials have the cubic structure (zinc blend). In our laboratory we have synthesized GaAs NWs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) either using a thin gold, manganese, Ga layer as the growth catalyst or without any catalyst. In this talk some of the basics of NWs, their growth and potential applications will be covered.

Resource People: 
Presenter
Fouzia Jabeen
Elletra Synchrotrone, University of Trieste, Italy.

Quantum Computing

Myth or Reality?
Registration: 
Open to all.
Date: 
15 July 2008
Time: 
11:00 am
Venue: 
University of Management and Technology, 2S 43 South Block UMT, C-II Johar Town, Lahore
Abstract: 

Quantum computers have occupied the imagination, time, energy and resources of many researchers worldwide. About ten years after the first prototypes became implementable in labs worldwide, are we still too far removed from a practical, useful realization? This talk will cover the basics of what quantum computers are, what they (or might) look like and why is there so much hype about them. This will be an elementary introduction aimed at the college-level science students.

Resource People: 
Speaker
Dr. Sabieh Anwar
LUMS School of Science and Engineering, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Lahore

Is reality really real?

From Albert Einstein to John Bell and beyond
Registration: 
Open to all.
Date: 
05 May 2008
Time: 
11:00 am
Venue: 
University of the Punjab, Lahore
Abstract: 

From elementary particles to superconductors, nature of vacuum to electronics industry, radioactivity to black holes, quantum mechanics has emerged as one of the most brilliant outcomes of the modern mind. But quantum mechanics is also riddled with paradoxes and counter-intuitive observations. It has cast doubts on the nature of "reality" itself! Does the moon really exist, whether we look at it or not? Come and explore how the greatest minds of our times have made attempts at reconciling quantum theory with reality, if at all possible? All in the words of one of Pakistan's most distinguished scientists.

Resource People: 
Speaker
Dr. M. Suhail Zubairy
Institute for Quantum Studies, Texas A&M University, Texas, USA

The Shape of Space

M-Branes and 11-Dimensional Geometry
Registration: 
Open to all.
Date: 
27 November 2007
Time: 
11:00 am
Venue: 
Department of Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore
Abstract: 

General Relativity tells us that all massive objects deform the backgrounds into which they are placed so that the very shape of space is changed by their presence. If, in addition, these objects happen to be charged, they give rise to a flux which distorts the background still further. In the talk, we will apply these simple ideas to gather information about the elusive 11-dimensional M-theory which gives rise to string theory. We will try to categorize some of the geometries that are allowed in M-Theory by studying what happens to a background when stable hyper-dimensional objects called BPS M-branes are brought into it.

Resource People: 
Speaker
Prof. Dr. Tasneem Zehra Husain
LUMS School of Science and Engineering, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Lahore

National Workshop on Crystal Structure Determination Using Powder X-ray Diffraction

Registration: 
Registration is required.
Date: 
15 August 2007
Time: 
09:00 am
Venue: 
Centre for Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore
Abstract: 

Powder X-Ray Diffraction is now a common technique used in the structure determination of different crystals. Read this Article on the Workshop on structure determination using powder X-ray diffraction.

 

Resource People: 
Presenter
Dr. Falak Sher
Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Allied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad
Presenter
Dr. N.M. Butt
Chairman Pakistan Science Foundation, Islamabad
Presenter
Dr. Umair Manzoor
Department of Physics, COMSATS, Islamabad
Presenter
Dr. Saadat Anwar Siddiqi
Centre for Solid State Physics, Punjab University, Lahore
Presenter
Dr. Arshad S. Bhatti
Department of Physics, COMSATS, Islamabad
Presenter
Dr. Sabieh Anwar
School of Science and Engineering, LUMS, Lahore
Presenter
Dr . Menges Goetz
Bruker-AXS, Germany

Carbon-Based Nanotechnology

Indigenous Research in Pakistan
Registration: 
Open to all.
Date: 
22 May 2006
Time: 
11:00 am
Venue: 
Faisal Library, University of Engineering and Technology (UET), Lahore
Abstract: 

Nanotechnology research in Pakistan dates back to late 1990's and at the moment it is one of the hottest research topic in the country. A number of research groups in private and government sector holds promise to bring this futuristic but practical technology to Pakistan. Carbon based Nanotechnology research was initiated in PINSTECH in 1998 by accidental observation of carbon clusters in locally developed heavy ion accelerator. The research was accelerated in 2003 with the funding of Ministry of Science and Technology to make Pakistan's first research laboratory dedicated for carbon based nano-science and technology. In this introductory talk I will give a glimpse of indigenous research we are doing in PINSTECH that includes both experimental and computational areas. The aim of this talk is to prove that Pakistan is not so backward in this high-tech area and we would like to invite and promote youngsters to step into this new but developing area.

Resource People: 
Speaker
Sabih-ud-Din Khan
Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Sciences and Technology, Islamabad
Supplementary Documents: